Global Media Issues

The U.S. Department of Education

In March 2008, the US Department of Education’s Office of Educational Technology convened an information session on media literacy that was open to all department employees.  Kimberly Brodie, Special Assistant in the Office of Educational Technology, led the discussion.  Tessa Jolls of the Consortium was an invited speaker, as well as Doug Levin of Cable in the Classroom, the U.S. cable industry’s education foundation.

The Mediated City and the Public

We explore the historical developments which have led most audiences to accept the dominance of private and commercial media spaces in the city.  In our second article, we discuss the positive roles that media, especially screen media, can play in urban life.  We introduce CML’s production-based curriculum that fosters teamwork and technology skills while teaching media literacy and nutrition.  

Propaganda and Media Literacy

In our first article, two prominent rhetoricians explain the differences between propaganda and persuasive discourse that stimulates engaged citizenship. Next, we review the premise of Edward Herman and Noam Chomsky's landmark Manufacturing Consent: The Political Economy of the Mass Media, and, with some assistance from media literacy scholar Renee Hobbs, we discuss responses to forms of propaganda which are more pervasive and indirect.

Fair Use and Media Literacy

This issue of “Connections” focuses on fair use of copyrighted works because it is an issue integral to the practice of media literacy education.  Two articles draw from documents produced by media and legal scholars: “The Cost of Copyright Confusion for Media Literacy Educators” and a “Code of Best Practices in Fair Use for Media Literacy Educators.” 

Digital Britain

The British Government releases an ambitious new plan for its media and communications industries, including a national plan for media literacy education.  Also, the British Office of Communications audit entitled Digital Lifestyles.

Citizen Journalism

The widespread availability of new media has generally encouraged the view that anyone can practice citizen journalism with relative ease.  But without learning the digital citizenship skills which media literacy training provides, citizen journalists may be as likely to engage in self-censorship as they are to incur legal liability for the content they publish. Also introduces Center for News Literacy.  

Participation in What?

Last month’s discussion between Tessa Jolls (CML) and Henry Jenkins (USC) focused on What’s in a name? Now, the conversation turns to preparing students for a participatory culture, but what does that mean? This issue tackles Participation in What? We’re all in agreement that students need media literacy education to participate fully in our global media environment but there are a variety of opinions about the tools and methods for making this a reality.  

Media Literacy Policy and Education

We review the Supreme Court case which struck down the 2005 California law banning sale of violent video games to minors, and explain why media literacy education could have fulfilled the intentions of the law.  In our second article, we follow the progress of media literacy initiatives in the European Union, as well as problems that need to be resolved.  An in-depth look at media violence was recently published by SAGE, and the Media Literacy Research Symposium brought together media literacy advocates from around the world.    

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