Media Advocacy / Activism

Gender Representation in Media

The representation of gender in media has long been a subject of fascination as well as critical analysis and change management for those advancing and practicing media literacy. In this issue of Connections, we highlight two organizations addressing these issues worldwide. Promundo, founded in Brazil in 1997, promotes gender equality and violence prevention by engaging men and boys in partnership with women and girls. The Global Media Monitoring Project (GMMP) teams with more than 100 countries to keep accurate data on gender representation in the news. 

Anytime, Anywhere Learning

The boundaries of classrooms are beginning to soften; students’ prior knowledge is more likely to be acknowledged and honored; the need to prepare students for lifelong learning – and to meet them where they are – all are indicative of a movement towards the type of pedagogy that media literacy fosters and delivers. This issue includes interviews with education entrepreneurs from: School on Wheels, Los Angeles; Ace Preparatory Academy, Indiannapolis; Da Vinci Charter Schools, Southern California.

Leadership for Media Literacy: Elizabeth Thoman

This issue pays tribute to the leadership and vision of Elizabeth Thoman, CML Founder and media literacy pioneer. Media literacy collegues expressed their gratitude for Thoman’s courage and commitment to the field of media literacy, and expressed optimism in building upon her vision and legacy.  Included is an introduction by Ann McMullen on leadership, and reflections by Dr. Henry Jenkins, University of Southern California (USC), and Dr. Bobbie Eisenstock, California State University, Northridge (CSUN).  MediaLit Moments activity is based upon Elizabeth Thoman's "feminist currency."

Citizenship in the Digital Age Part 2

This issue continues our discussion of the power shift in the media ecosystem, and what it means to be a citizen in a digital age. CML interviewed two digital literacy advocates – Kimberly Brodie, Founder/CEO of The Digital Peace Project, and Alan Simpson from iKeepSafe. 

CML is sad to inform our readers of the death of Elizabeth Thoman. Thoman was a pioneer and visionary who founded the Center for Media Literacy in 1989.  

Citizenship in the Digital Age

This issue focuses on the 2016 presidential election, where technology is going and the challenges that we face in teaching about it. CML interviewed two media literacy advocates – Stephen Balkam from Family Online Safety Institute and Tara O’Gorman, a teacher from a media literacy magnet school in New York. Also includes resources and MediaLit Moments Activity on Fake News. This is Part 1 of a series on Citizenship in the Digital Age.

Education and The Creative Economy: Australia

This month we continue to explore Education and The Creative Economy by featuring exciting initiatives being undertaken in Australia, where media literacy is now embedded in the national curriculum through media arts, and where the Australian government has prioritized supporting and growing the creative economy.  CML interviewed two Australian education/media literacy leaders, one who works in higher education – Michael Dezuanni -- and the other in secondary education, Roger Dunscombe.

Documentary Film and Media Literacy

In this issue of Connections, we discuss the art and craft of documentary, a genre which utilizes techniques that differ widely from fiction film, including investigation and presentation of evidence, interviews, moral inquiry, calls to action, presentation of human relationships for emotional impact, and much more.   The MediaLit Moments activity is He Named Me Malala. The activity uses the 2015 documentary of the same name.

Media Literacy and Human Rights

The constructed nature of media is highly visible in examples of human rights coverage – from genocide to disabilities to incidents of civic rights violations.  CML offers diverse examples of construction at work.  This issue also includes highlights from the first US Media Literacy Week as well as an interview with Robert Ferguson about his work with Roma populations in the UK.

 

Community Media

Active participation by citizens.  Local community engagement.  Expanding media access to all.  Empowerment through education.  Tackling tough issues in communities.  Freedom of speech.  Storytelling. Citizen journalism.  Understanding media and how it operates.  Where do all of these important undertakings – essential to media literacy -- happen?  In community media centers around the U.S. and the world.  In this issue we provide two case examples of community media centers and their commitment to media literacy education: one in Dublin, Ireland and one in Brookline, Massachusetts.

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